Posts for tag: shoes

By Podiatry Associates of Indiana Foot & Ankle Institute
May 05, 2020
Category: Foot Care
Tags: shoes   Injuries  
The Right ShoesExercise is an important aspect of keeping our bodies healthy and happy. That’s why it’s so important to wear the correct shoes for certain activities. Whether you’re an athlete, workout buff, or enjoy walking and hiking, you need the proper footwear. It makes the difference between enjoying your favorite activities and sitting out with an avoidable injury. Talk to your podiatrist to have your feet evaluated for your future workout needs.
 
Essential Equipment
All exercise involves your feet, ankles, and knees. Placing pressure on them puts you at risk for strains, sprains, and wear-and-tear injuries. Find shoes made specifically for the activity you engage in while also providing a good fit. They should accommodate your body and activity level. 
 
Pay attention to the wear on your older shoes. The soles show where you need more support in the future. The right shoe also feels good from the start. Don’t believe the sentiment that a shoe needs to be broken in. This is not true and creates ongoing problems. 
 
Matching Your Shoe to Your Sport
Different types of exercise affect your feet in different ways. Your shoes need to support the high-risk areas. 
  • Running requires shoes with shock absorption. Your feet take on a lot of pressure and friction. Cushioning your shoes in the correct areas keeps you from feeling the pain. 
  • Traction is important in sports that need quick changes in direction and sprinting, like basketball. Traction should never be too high or low. The right shoes keep you from slipping on the floor while letting you move and pivot.
  • Ankle support is a must. It limits the side-to-side movement that knocks your ankle out of alignment. This kind of support keeps ankle sprains at bay. For sports like basketball, hockey, skiing, and skating, make sure that your shoes aren’t too high. Otherwise, they will dig into your Achilles tendon. You can also wear soft ankle braces.
  • Arch support varies for everyone. Your podiatrist can test your foot to determine your gait. Depending on the results, your podiatrist can recommend orthotics or special shoe inserts.
Remember to Replace Your Old Shoes
Pay attention to the state of your shoes to understand when to replace them. When the condition starts to decline, especially the arch support and sole, it’s time to go shopping. Start looking for a replacement when they become uncomfortable and wear differently. You don’t have to wear shoes for a long time for them to wear out either. If you are participating in sports or activity on an almost daily basis, your shoes are bound to wear out quickly. 

A bunion is a bump on the joint of the big toe — called the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint — that forms when the bone or tissue on that joint moves out of place and extends out beyond the normal anatomical curvature of the toe. Because this joint carries much of the body’s weight while walking, bunions can cause debilitating pain if left untreated. Unfortunately, bunions do not go away over time. In fact, if you ignore it, the condition will only get worse ... and worse ... until the pain is so debilitating you have no choice but to see a podiatrist.

Bunions are brought about by years of abnormal motion and pressure on the MTP joint brought on by the way we walk, our genetic foot type or our shoe choices. People who suffer from flat feet or low arches are also at added risk along with arthritic patients and those with inflammatory joint disease. Typically, we treat many younger women who have been wearing ill-fitting shoes (the wrong size or styles which squeeze toes together) and athletes wearing the wrong size athletic shoe apparel.

How can I get rid of it?

We will initally recommend selecting a shoe with a wide and deep toe box. Stay away from shoes with heels higher than two inches. Custom Orthotics may be useful in controlling foot function and may reduce symptoms and prevent worsening of the deformity. Apply an over-the-counter, non-medicated bunion pad around the bunion any time you wear a shoe. If your bunion is inflamed and sore, apply ice packs several times a day to reduce swelling.

If these initial efforts fail, it’s time to see a podiatrist who specializes in bunion therapy. Initially, the podiatrist may prescribe an anti-inflammatory drug and/or cortisone injection to reduce pain and inflammation. Ultrasound therapy is also a popular technique for treating soft tissue damage.

Surgical options for the most serious bunions

When these doctor-prescribed therapies fail, podiatric surgery may be needed to permanently relieve pressure and repair the toe joint. A bunionectomy will remove the bony enlargement, restore the normal alignment of the toe joint, and alleviate the pain. But understand, the short-term recovery from this type of surgery takes time and discomfort can last several weeks. 

Prevention tips

The best defense against bunions is to prevent them:

• Avoid shoes with pointed triangular tips and wearing high heels for extended periods of time each day.

• Know your “real” shoe size (today) which can increase with age, weight gain and pregnancy.

See a board-certified podiatrist at the first sign of a bunion deformity.

Like any medical condition, treating bunions early on saves time, discomfort and money down the line. Seek treatment now before the condition worsens and a more invasive course of action is needed.



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